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Archive for October 13th, 2008

Much Ado About Much Ado!

Joe and I went to see a production of Much Ado About Nothing at Shakespeare in the Parking-Lot, sponsored by Arts Fifth, starring the incomparable Izzybella as Margaret! Okay, it starred Emmy Klein (Hero), Jordan Cole (Beatrice), Paul Logsdon (Claudio) and Joseph Aholt (Benedick) under the able direction of Shawn Gann. But if you didn’t think Izzybella could play a seductive sleazebag, you’d better think again. I’m just sayin’. 

The cast did a great job. Logsdon played it a little cheesily, but really, it’s very difficult to take Claudio seriously. Cole and Aholt played well off each other, particularly when they’re being set up to fall in love by the conspirators. Aholt’s migration along the bottom of the stage was nearly as delicious as Cole’s wide-eyed shock at hearing that Beatrice does not deserve such a good man as Benedick. Dogberry and Verges were well-played by Patrick Kegley and Matthew Duecy. I nearly laughed myself into hiccups at their antics, stopping just in time. (When I get hiccups, they echo. They can also be heard two counties over. I think that would have been disruptive for the actors and the audience.)

The person who really stole the show, though, was Aja Jones as Don John. She startled her castmates and delighted the audience by donning an accent nearly as outrageous as her huge black moustache.  It got to the point that all she had to do was enter to get the audience laughing.

All in all, it was a good show. If you’re in the DFW area, you’ll want to go see this one. Arts Fifth, Fifth Avenue at Allen in Fort Worth. It runs again this weekend–10/17, 10/18, and 10/19 at 8 p.m. Admission is free; concessions will be sold during intermission.

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Who Am I? Who? Who?

I saw this at Janet’s and had to play along.

Your result for Are You a Jackie or a Marilyn? Or Someone Else? Mad Men-era Female Icon Quiz…

You Are an Ingrid!

mm.ingrid_.jpg

You are an Ingrid — “I am unique”

Ingrids have sensitive feelings and are warm and perceptive.

How to Get Along with Me

  • * Give me plenty of compliments. They mean a lot to me. (If they’re sincere. I hate fake compliments)
  • * Be a supportive friend or partner. Help me to learn to love and value myself.
  • * Respect me for my special gifts of intuition and vision.
  • * Though I don’t always want to be cheered up when I’m feeling melancholy, I sometimes like to have someone lighten me up a little.
  • * Don’t tell me I’m too sensitive or that I’m overreacting!

What I Like About Being an Ingrid

  • * my ability to find meaning in life and to experience feeling at a deep level
  • * my ability to establish warm connections with people
  • * admiring what is noble, truthful, and beautiful in life
  • * my creativity, intuition, and sense of humor
  • * being unique and being seen as unique by others
  • * having aesthetic sensibilities
  • * being able to easily pick up the feelings of people around me

What’s Hard About Being an Ingrid

  • * experiencing dark moods of emptiness and despair
  • * feelings of self-hatred and shame; believing I don’t deserve to be loved
  • * feeling guilty when I disappoint people
  • * feeling hurt or attacked when someone misundertands me
  • * expecting too much from myself and life
  • * fearing being abandoned
  • * obsessing over resentments
  • * longing for what I don’t have

Ingrids as Children Often

  • * have active imaginations: play creatively alone or organize playmates in original games
  • * are very sensitive
  • * feel that they don’t fit in
  • * believe they are missing something that other people have
  • * attach themselves to idealized teachers, heroes, artists, etc.
  • * become antiauthoritarian or rebellious when criticized or not understood
  • * feel lonely or abandoned (perhaps as a result of a death or their parents’ divorce)

Ingrids as Parents

  • * help their children become who they really are
  • * support their children’s creativity and originality
  • * are good at helping their children get in touch with their feelings
  • * are sometimes overly critical or overly protective
  • * are usually very good with children if not too self-absorbed

 

Take Are You a Jackie or a Marilyn? Or Someone Else? Mad Men-era Female Icon Quiz at HelloQuizzy

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